Teaching Experience

Teaching Fellow, Theology Department, Boston College (2017-2018)

  • Biblical Heritage I and II: What, Whence, and the Whither the Bible (THEO1001), 6 credits, undergraduate level, instructor (Fall 2017-Spring 2018)
    • Course Description: The Bible is fundamental for Judaism and Christianity (and to some extent Islam) and Jews and Christians consider it Scripture. It is foundational for Western thought and has influenced modern conceptions of God, nature, human origins, the problem of evil, and the role and function of government. For example, the current Queen of England, Elizabeth II, is still called “The Defender of the Faith.” When modern philosophers debate the existence of God, it is always one God, not the many gods that most peoples throughout history have worshiped. In short, the Bible has and continues to shape our world. An adequate knowledge of its contains is vital for understanding not only ancient Israel, Judaism, and Christianity, but also Western history and culture. This course introduces students to the books of the Bible, their historical and social contexts, and theological messages.
    • Primary Modes of Instruction: lecture, in-class exegesis and activities, and online assignments.
    • Responsibilities: course and assignment designer, lecturer, and grader.

Teacher Assistant, Theology Department, Boston College (2015-2017)

  • Biblical Heritage I and II: What, Whence, and the Whither the Bible (THEO1001), 6 credits, undergraduate level, with Dr. Yonder Gillihan (Fall 2016-Spring 2017)
    • Course Description: The Christian Bible has informed discussion on the nature of God, humanity, and the relationship between them. Contemporary interpreters appeal to Scripture to support their ideas about justice, the origins of life, and what a well-ordered society should look like. The texts of the Bible continue to inspire art and literature: besides appearing in political speeches and courthouse monuments, Biblical themes, characters, and texts show up in the visual arts, film, television, and literature. Despite the frequency with which the Bible is used, our Biblical heritage is, to a large extent, little understood due to a single factor: most people, religious or not, have not read the Bible carefully, if at all, and are unfamiliar with its contents. This course introduces students to the Bible, with strong emphasis on the historical settings and meanings of its texts. Students develop knowledge and interpretive skills by reading the primary sources carefully, and by making use of the interpretive tools methods described in lecture and assigned readings. While it cannot be expected that all members of the class will come to the same conclusions, all should understand the various methods of modern Biblical scholarship, and be able to relate their conclusions to Jewish and Christian theology.
    • Primary Modes of Instruction: lecture and online assignments.
    • Responsibilities: grader and occasional lecturer.
  • The Religious Quest I and II: A Comparison of the Religious Traditions of Daoism and Christianity (THEO1161), 6 credits, undergraduate level, with Dr. David Mozina (Fall 2015- Spring 2016)
    • Course Description: This course explores two religious traditions rarely put into conversation: Daoism and Christianity. Daoism (daojiao 道教) is a broad label pointing to many traditions of practice and thought indigenous to China, each concerned with ways in which human beings return to, accord with, or manifest the power of the Dao—the origin of all that is and the vivifying impulse coursing through the world. Christianity is an equally broad label referring to many traditions of practice and thought that recognize a 1st-century CE Jew, Jesus of Nazareth, as the one, true God.
    • Primary Modes of Instruction: lecture, in-class exegesis and activities, and online assignments.
    • Responsibilities: grader, occasional assignment designer and lecturer